Rescued from a life of infamy

The madams at Montreal’s red light houses “are constantly endeavouring to find new victims,” the Montreal Herald reports. One young girl, however, is rescued from a life of infamy, as reported in this item from in the Quebec Daily News, November 21, 1862.

Another unpleasant case has been brought to light. On Wednesday a woman represented to a young girl in Three Rivers that she could procure her a situation in Montreal. She finally persuaded her to accompany her to this city, and taking passage on the steamer Napoleon, they arrived here yesterday morning.

The girl’s father, however, had fortunately discovered the trap into which his daughter had been led, and immediately started in pursuit. He caught the Quebec boat as it passed, and reached Montreal yesterday morning about five o’clock.

The police were at once informed of the circumstances of the case, and Detective Coallier discovered the girl, in company with the procuress, in a disreputable house in St. Constant Street. He took them both in charge, and the woman was brought before the Judge of the Sessions of the Peace.

It appears that no action could be taken in the matter, as the offence was committed out of his district. It is to be hoped, however, that the woman will not escape the punishment she so richly deserves for her fiendish conduct.

The young girl, it is believed, was saved from violence in the house to which she had been taken, and was thus probably prevented from entering on a life of infamy and shame. She was taken home by her father, who, with all other parents, and especially those residing in the country, should be extremely careful of allowing their daughters to form acquaintances with those suspicious characters who are constantly endeavoring to find new victims, whom they never abandon until they are as degraded as themselves.

Unfamiliar Canadian history stories 047

 

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